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Health and Safety Films

Health and Safety Films on Reel America

  • "Censored 1980 OSHA Films" - Occupational and environmental health and safety consultant Mark Catlin discussed three 1980 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) films that were created during the Carter administration, then recalled by the Reagan administration in 1981. Mr. Catlin used the films as training tools in the early 1980s, has helped preserve and make them available to the public, and maintains a YouTube channel devoted to worker history and safety films.
  • "Can't Take It No More"  - Narrated by Studs Terkel, this OSHA film documents the history of occupational safety and health in the U.S. from the early 1900s to the 1970s. Weaving archival film of unsafe conditions and tragedies with stories about improving worker safety in the 1970s, the film celebrates progress but argues that more must be done. This and two other 1980 Carter administration OSHA films were recalled in 1981 by the Reagan administration, but several labor unions and others retained copies and used them for training and education.
  • "OSHA" - This Occupational Safety and Health film describes OSHA’s mission to reduce workplace disease, injury, and death, and informs workers and employers about their legal rights. The film visits a textile mill and a foundry, and tells the story of workers in Hopewell, Virginia, in the mid-1970s who were exposed to the now globally banned pesticide Kepone. The documentary ends with the story of a worker dying with cancer from prolonged exposure to benzine. This and two other 1980 Carter administration OSHA films were recalled in 1981 by the Reagan administration - but several labor unions and others retained copies and used them for training and education.
  • "Worker to Worker" - This Occupational Safety and Health Administration film shows how workers might approach employers and union officials to demand better conditions. The film profiles Washington, D.C.-area Metro Rail worker’s efforts to improve safety, a short order cook in a cold kitchen, automobile tire manufacturing workers learning about hazardous fumes, and birth defects in children of several chemical plant workers. This and two other 1980 Carter administration OSHA films were recalled in 1981 by the Reagan administration - but several labor unions and others retained copies and used them for training and education.
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